Bloodlines (Bloodlines #1) by Lindsay Anne Kendal Review

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Bloodlines (Bloodlines, #1)Bloodlines by Lindsay Anne Kendal
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Goodreads Synopsis:
Keira Jameson used to lead a normal life, she just had a gift, passed down through the generations of her family. Now, after hearing voices, having strange dreams of others calling out to her, and her grandfather’s last words haunting her, she sets out to find other families like hers. Along with her best friend Lily, the only person outside her family to know about her gift, Keira begins a hunt for her ancestors. A chance meeting with a young man, Lucian Turner, sets them on the right track, but their discoveries change the way Keira will see herself for ever more. Fear, superstition and heritage are shaping Keira’s future and she must face her enemies, even if this could mean losing her life. She cannot escape her destiny.
Part Buffy-style horror, part tender romance, Bloodlines will have fans of the genre on tenterhooks waiting for the next instalment of this gripping and hell-raising tale.

My Review:
I was really excited to read this book, it had been on my to-read list forever, but I kept putting it off. The description made it sound like it was something I’d love, but this book is not my new favourite.
Keira is a young adult searching for anything that can help her figure out her powers and her family’s past. Although I can’t tell you how old she is, I can tell you she can get into a bar no problem. Her friend Lily, who has no powers of her own, shadows her constantly, but not in a bad way. The characters were a little awkward at first, and the story kept moving too quickly and losing me. I feel like the wrong things were described, an example being when Keira mowed down four people with her powers in less than a paragraph, but Lucians house was described for almost half a page, and the most of the characters were just talking at each other, dumping information onto one another. I constantly felt like I was missing a big part of the book when I started it, like it started in the middle.
The story progresses and my feelings towards it don’t change, and they didn’t change, until about three quarters of the way into the book, when although I wanted to know more, I also wanted the story to be over. Why does having powers mean you can do literally anything you want? I feel like I was being told things, rather than being showed them. Keira can cast spells on people and places without a second thought, but when asked to protect the house, she’s appalled. The characters, even though I know they have powers and that’s not realistic, don’t seem like they could be real. They act strange and throw tantrums and just do whatever Keira says. People are apparently using chamber pots? Why was that even brought up? The relationships between characters confused me, like day one they met and then day two they were instantly in love and in the perfect relationship? I really tried to like this book but it just wasn’t for me.

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Tragedy Girl by Christine Hurley Deriso

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Tragedy GirlTragedy Girl by Christine Hurley Deriso
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Goodreads Synopsis:
Of course Anne would be drawn to Blake. He’s good looking, he’s friendly, and they both bring sob stories to the table: her parents died in a car wreck, his girlfriend, Cara, drowned. Of course Blake would understand what she’s gone through. And of course they can help each other work through the pain. It’s like it was meant to be.
But just as Anne starts to feel she’s finally found something good in all the tragedy, she can’t ignore signs that something’s off. Her friends rarely let her be alone with Blake. Even those closest to Blake seem uneasy around him. And then there are the rumors about the death of Cara, whose body was never recovered. Rumors that suggest Blake’s pain is hiding something darker than Anne can even begin to comprehend . . .

My Review:
I loved this book. I received a copy from netgalley in exchange for an honest review, and although it took me a while to get around to reading it, I’m really glad I did. Although it starts off slow, and I suspected it would be a relaxing easy read, this was a really exciting story once you get far enough into it. I expected it to be kind of slow and boring but was pleasantly surprised when there was mystery and action involved.
Anne with an ‘e’ or E, as her friend calls her, has been through a terrible tragedy. Her parents were killed prior to the story, and she recently moved to a new place, in with her aunt and uncle who have no kids of their own. She then has to attend a new school, make new friends, and deal with her grief all at once. She meets a boy she likes and the story goes on. I did not expect the ending at all, and about half way through the book I realized, I can’t put this down now! I need to finish it!
All in all I read the full story in about 5 hours. It’s a really good read, and I recommend you check it out. The cover is intriguing and I just love the characters, they really seem like they could be real people, and they act their age. I put off reading it for so long because it didn’t seem like anything new at the beginning, but once you get into it you realize how good it really is.

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Time Trap (Red Moon, #1) by Micah Caida Review

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Time Trap (Red Moon, #1)Time Trap by Micah Caida
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Goodreads Synopsis:
Micah Caida’s stunning debut young adult book TIME TRAP is like nothing before it, according to early readers.
Time Trap, book one in the Red Moon series
Her memory is blank.
Her future’s in question.
Her power is dangerous.
Waking up in an unknown world, Rayen learns only that she’s seventeen and is hunted by a sentient beast. Terrified that she may never learn who she really is or find her way back to her home, she’s captured in a land that is at times familiar even if the people and the structures seem alien. When local law enforcement delivers her to a private school, she’s labeled as a Native American runaway, and Rayen discovers a secret with deadly repercussions. Forced into an unlikely alliance with a computer savvy street punk and a gifted oddball girl to save their world – and the future – Rayen finds the key to an identity that no person would want.

My Review:
Honestly I didn’t like this book, up until about 30% of the way through. I thought it was confusing, the characters didn’t have much life, and I didn’t know what to expect for the remaining part of the book. Then something changed. I was so sucked into the story that I didn’t realize how much of the book I had actually read. The characters became more interesting, and the story started taking turns I didn’t expect. I wasn’t bored anymore, I couldn’t put it down!
Rayen wakes up in a desert, with amnesia. A ghost tells her that she’s seventeen, her name is Rayen, and that she’s allergic to peanuts. She doesn’t understand the world around her, and she really has a hard time. She gets arrested and taken to a boarding school, and some of the kids in the school are really rude to her, they think she’s a foster child turned criminal, and they’re determined to figure her out. The only problem is, what could they find out? She doesn’t know anything about herself.
The story itself is a little slow at first, but if you give it a chance, I’m sure you’ll feel the same as I do. This is an action packed exciting novel in what I imagine must look like a dr. seuss story type world of tomorrow. Any question I had reading this, were pretty much answered at the end. The characters although a little annoying at first are great once you get to know them a little better. It’s unlike anything I’ve read before, and that’s a good thing. I don’t want to spoil any part of the story for anyone so I’ll end it at that. Definitely check it out! I got it for free on amazon.

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The Last Orphans by N.W. Harris Review

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The Last Orphans (The Last Orphans, #1)The Last Orphans by N.W. Harris
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Goodreads Synopsis:
One horrifying day will change the life of sixteen-year-old Shane Tucker and every other kid in the world.
In a span of mere hours, the entire adult population is decimated, leaving their children behind to fend for themselves and deal with the horrific aftermath of the freak occurrence. As one of the newly made elders in his small town, Shane finds himself taking on the role of caretaker for a large group of juvenile survivors. One who just happens to be Kelly Douglas—an out-of-his-league classmate—who, on any other day, would have never given Shane a second glance.
Together, they begin their quest to find out why all of the adults were slaughtered. What they find is even more horrifying than anything they could have expected—the annihilation of the adults was only the beginning. Shane and his friends are not the unlucky survivors left to inherit this new, messed-up planet. No, they are its next victims. There is an unknown power out there, and it won’t stop until every person in the world is dead.
A spine-tingling adventure that will have you gasping for breath all the way until the last page, The Last Orphans is the first book in an all-new apocalyptic series.

My Review:
The Last orphans isn’t what I expected, from looking at the cover. Quite frankly, up until I’d read a third of the book, I wasn’t sure I was going to like it. Then something changed, I really got interested in what was going to happen next, and I wanted to know more about how the characters were going to react. All in all, this book took me about 4 hours to read cover to cover, which is 277 pages, despite sitting in my currently reading shelf for the better part of a year. I received this book from Amazon for free.
Shane is a sixteen year old boy, headed home from his granny’s funeral one afternoon. His dad, drunk and driving, decides to pick yet another fight with him, and obviously that doesn’t turn out very well. He’s left stranded in the middle of nowhere by himself, so he decides to head to his granny’s house. That’s when things start getting weird. Swarms of bees are just flying around, lookin for something to attack. Cows in the field are charging around aimlessly. Suddenly, he’s thrown into an apocalypse. Shane bands together with whoever he can find, to figure out what their next step is.
This book is a fast paced, gory action packed story and the characters are pretty lifelike, although traumatized, they seem to act their age, which is always nice. It’s an easy read, and although I wasn’t so sure about it at the beginning, I was sucked into the story at almost the half way mark. So if you try it, give it a chance before you decide how you feel. I had a lot of questions circulating my head while I was reading this book, but by the end of the book they were answered. I also really like the cover, I think that’s what really stood out for me about this book in the first place.
Overall, It’s a good story. I will most likely try to track down the second book in the series, just to see what happens next. If you haven’t read it yet, you might want to check it out if you like apocalyptic stories with a little bit of gore!

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Architects of Destiny by Amy DuBoff

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Architects of Destiny (Cadicle #1)Architects of Destiny by Amy DuBoff
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Goodreads Synopsis: This is an alternate cover edition for ASIN: B00TT6OIFO

Out of sight beyond Earth, the Taran empire spans the galaxy from its seat of power on Tararia.

Cris Sietinen was born with rare telekinetic gifts—abilities he refuses to ignore, regardless of the governing Priesthood’s decrees. But, as heir to the most influential Dynasty on Tararia, only a stifled life of business and politics awaits him within the confines of his family’s estate. Determined to be true to himself and explore the potential of his abilities, Cris leaves Tararia to begin a new life touring the stars. When Cris unexpectedly receives an invitation to join the Tararian Selective Service (TSS), the only organization to offer an official telekinesis training program, a new future awaits. It’s his dream opportunity to be among people like himself, free from the Priesthood and political objectives. Except, Cris’ path was designed, and he’s right where the Priesthood wants him.

Architects of Destiny is the first installment in the Cadicle series. A fast-paced space adventure with intrigue, coming-of-age and romance, this short novel is a prelude to the defining events in Tararia’s history in the ensuing years.

Is it possible to change destiny? The Cadicle series follows three generations of the pivotal Sietinen Dynasty as each learns their part in an elaborately orchestrated galactic conflict. Torn by politics, love and war, the Cadicle and those he holds most dear must choose between duty and morality as the true nature of their purpose unfolds. Through their roles as Agents in the Tararian Selective Service, they will be on the front lines of space battles, but the political skirmishes they must face on Tararia could prove just as dangerous. The Cadicle holds the key to winning both, but at what cost?

My Review: First of all, I really liked the cover of this book. There wasn’t any specific reason I chose to read it at this time, aside from it being the first book on my list in my reading app, but I’m glad I chose it. I wasn’t too sure what I was getting into when it began, but basically it’s about a boy named Cris, who has telepathic powers. His family is pretty much royalty, they’re super rich and have a lot of control. But Cris is more than just a boy with telepathic powers. He has his own thoughts, and most of them are about how he feels like he’s a replacement for his dead brother, and what he’s going to do as the heir of his family. He has family troubles, is what I’m trying to get at. His world bans telepathy, and his father wants him to ignore his powers. So he runs away. And from there, his life just progressively becomes more and more interesting. The book goes through five years of his life, and lets just say lots of things happen in that time. I loved that not only were the main characters interesting, but the characters around them were too. The world seemed so lifelike for most of it being in space. I know Cris is young at the beginning of the book, but at 19 years old I found I could enjoy reading this book and almost everything in it. I’m glad he grew and changed as a person through the story, and has plans to change the world. The only things I didn’t like about this book, were the parts where there were time jumps, like it moved a year or 3 forward. Although it helped progress the story along, it’s hard to believe that nothing interesting happened during those periods of time. That’s a long time to just space out for. I didn’t like how Cris and Kate talked to each other at first, although it was formal it came off as awkward to me. Not that people aren’t awkward, just strange. I don’t understand the one letter change in the swears, but there were only a couple. That’s about it, though. The rest of the book I fully enjoyed, and will be looking into the second book in the series. I definitely recommend you check it out if you want a breath of fresh air, and you’re looking for something new to read. Thanks for reading!

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My Review of: Avalon (Avalon #1) by Mindee Arnett

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Avalon (Avalon, #1)Avalon by Mindee Arnett
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Goodreads Synopsis: A ragtag group of teenage mercenaries who crew the spaceship Avalon stumble upon a conspiracy that could threaten the entire galaxy in this fascinating and fast-paced sci-fi adventure from author Mindee Arnett.

Of the various star systems that make up the Confederation, most lie thousands of light-years from First Earth-and out here, no one is free. The agencies that govern the Confederation are as corrupt as the crime bosses who patrol it, and power is held by anyone with enough greed and ruthlessness to claim it. That power is derived from one thing: metatech, the devices that allow people to travel great distances faster than the speed of light.

Jeth Seagrave and his crew of teenage mercenaries have survived in this world by stealing unsecured metatech, and they’re damn good at it. Jeth doesn’t care about the politics or the law; all he cares about is earning enough money to buy back his parents’ ship, Avalon, from his crime-boss employer and getting himself and his sister, Lizzie, the heck out of Dodge. But when Jeth finds himself in possession of information that both the crime bosses and the government are willing to kill for, he is going to have to ask himself how far he’ll go to get the freedom he’s wanted for so long.

Avalon is the perfect fit for teens new to sci-fi as well as seasoned sci-fi readers looking for more books in the YA space-and a great match for fans of Joss Whedon’s cult hit show Firefly.

My Review: From the moment I picked up this book, I was hooked. I love books about space. Although there weren’t any aliens in it, the story sucked me in until the last page. I know it took me a couple months to finally finish this book, but when I wasn’t reading it, I was thinking about it. Jeth and Lizzie are siblings who have a less than legal job stealing spaceships for their metadrive’s, and Jethro is also the captain of a ship called Avalon, who belonged to their parents before they passed away. This book had a little bit of an awkward start for me, the sentences didn’t feel quite right reading them out loud, but that quickly changed and it was a smooth read from then on. I found myself wondering why there were only humans on the planets, but that was swept away as I got further into the book. It’s a very exciting story, filled with twists I didn’t expect and lots of action. It progresses along at a nice pace, and the characters really grow throughout the book. I haven’t read anything like it before, and I really like the cover. The characters are full of depth and backstory, and the new characters that are introduced fit right in with everyone else. Jethro is a strong and interesting character, and he’s a fitting lead for the story. I feel like everyone in the book could be real people out there somewhere, and that’s awesome. I mean sure, not flying around in spaceships like the story, but you know what I mean. I chose to read this book especially because I like space, and my little cousins name is Avalon and I thought it was funny. I really got attached to the characters, and I felt bad for all the heartache and betrayal they have to go through, but the story really was a good read. I definitely recommend it if you haven’t read it already! I’ll definitely check out the next book. Thanks for reading.

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My Review of: Fragile Bones: Harrison & Anna (One-2-one) by Lorna Schultz Nicholson

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Fragile Bones: Harrison & AnnaFragile Bones: Harrison & Anna by Lorna Schultz Nicholson
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Goodreads Synopsis: One is a fifteen-year-old boy with an uncanny ability to recite every bone in the skeletal system whenever he gets anxious ― and that happens a lot. The meaning of “appropriate behaviour” mystifies him: he doesn’t understand most people and they certainly don’t understand him.

The other is a graduating senior with the world at her feet. Joining the Best Buddies club at her school and pairing up with a boy with high-functioning autism is the perfect addition to her med school applications. Plus, the president of the club is a rather attractive, if mysterious, added attraction.

Told in the alternating voices of Harrison and Anna, Fragile Bones is the story of two teens whose lives intertwine in unexpected ways.

My Review: When I started this book I thought maybe I was a little too old for it, but that went away when I realized it was just a regular story about a girl and a boy. There aren’t many books with people with autism in them, so I thought I’d give it a shot, and it was a short but nice change of pace. Anna is very patient, and I was glad everything wrapped up nicely in the end for her. The writing style was simple. Nothing overly exciting happened, but nothing too bad happened either which is good. I really liked the cover for this book, that’s actually why I picked this book out. I appreciated the rotating points of view between Anna and Harrison, it kept things interesting throughout the story. All in all, it was a good book, but I probably won’t read it again, and if I find the rest of the books I’ll read them, but I won’t seek them out. Thanks for reading.

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